Latest News From Bumper to Bumper Radio

Should I turn into the skid? How much braking distance do I need in a storm? Ice and snow are hitting the road during the busy holiday season. Racecar driver and automotive expert Lauren Fix, the Car Coach® provides important winter driving and safety tips. Share with friends and loved ones who will be driving during the holidays!

Retail averages have increased 28 of the past 30 days and prices have moved higher by fractions of a penny since Friday. The national average for regular unleaded gasoline currently sits at $2.29 per gallon, which is five cents more than one week ago, 16 cents more than one month ago and 29 cents more year-over-year.

Heading into 2017, gasoline demand is expected to drop drastically during the month of January following the busy holiday travel season. Over the past five years, the average drop during that period has been 358,000 b/d or about 15-million gallons, according to OPIS. The oil information service estimates a larger dip this year.

Listen to Dave Riccio of Bumper to Bumper Radio & Tri-City Transmission along with a panel of BBB Ethics Award winners share winning strategies in the areas of marketing, technology, human resources, and finance.

BBB Torch Awards for Ethics winners also highlight how ethics impacts their bottom line and company culture.

 

That very unofficial nine mile-per-hour “tolerance cushion” on Arizona’s interstate highway system is going away by the end of the month on certain freeway segments.

Arizona Department of Transportation, Department of Public Safety and Governor’s Office of Highway Safety are designating 63 miles of Interstates 10 and 40, and U.S. 60 as safety corridors.

These zero-tolerance corridors will see heavy traffic enforcement efforts in an attempt to reduce the number of accidents, motorist injuries and excessive deaths.

The news from ADOT came Dec. 12, the day the first phase of enforcement went into effect for two segments on I-10.

A video shows two cars crashing head-on at 35 miles per hour. (Don't worry, the drivers are crash test dummies.) One car is red, one is silver.

The red car crumples like an accordion. The dummy's face collides with the steering wheel as glass flies everywhere. Then the entire front of the cabin collapses in, pushing the dummy's knees up and crushing them against the dashboard.

The front of the silver car is also crushed. But the frame of the car is relatively intact This dummy flies forward in the seat belt, but front and side airbags soften the blow. The windshield cracks, but doesn't shatter. They're both Nissan cars. The red car is a 2015 Tsuru, manufactured for sale in Mexico. The silver one is a 2016 Versa, made for the U.S. market.
 
In a crash test, Mexico's lowest-priced Nissan (left) collided with America's least expensive Nissan. The dummy's face hit the steering wheel in the Mexican model. Airbags in the American model softened the blow.

When it comes to cars, our main goal here at Good Works Auto Repair is to keep you safe and your car running better and longer. Often times, we teach our customers about auto repairs, preventative maintenance or other services related to your vehicles but today we thought we would look at recalls, and their impact on our vehicle and even more importantly, our safety.

Many drivers ignore recalls, don’t know what to do when they receive a recall notice or become worried or angry and don’t know where to turn. A recent article in Your Mechanic by Jason Unrau explains what a recall is and what you should do if you receive one.

Looking for an auto repair shop that you can trust to work on your vehicle is an important decision. There are a slew of repair shops out there, and it can sometimes be overwhelming to pick the right one – from honesty to price concerns to quality workmanship, there are a lot of factors to consider. Well another factor to consider is whether they are a female friendly auto repair shop. It might seem like an inconsequential issue, but it isn’t. Statistics show that 60% – 70% of repair shop customers these days are women, not men.

Realistically speaking, women aren’t looking for a spa like experience when they go in to have their brakes replaced or their oil changed, but they are looking for a few female friendly amenities. So how can you spot a female friendly auto repair shop? Here are a few features to be on the lookout for:

Lives saved estimated at nearly 345,000 since 1975

Seat belt use in the United States has reached its highest level since the Federal government began regular national surveys in 1994, according to a study released by the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

"The best way folks can protect themselves in their cars is by wearing a seat belt," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. "Whether you're a driver or passenger, in the front seat or back, the simple act of wearing a seat belt significantly reduces the risk of fatality and major injury in a crash."

Lauren Fix, The Car Coach® tells how the technology this year is really aimed at de-stressing the driving experience so that everyone can get to the destination they want. See new features in vehicles such as virtual cockpit, gesture control, cabin watch and activity key at the 2017 New York International Auto Show.

ORLANDO, Fla. (April 4, 2017) – According to a new AAA survey, 64 million American drivers would not be able to pay for an unexpected vehicle repair without going into debt, indicating that some drivers may underestimate the full cost of owning and operating a vehicle. Because some car repairs are unavoidable, and the average repair bill is between $500 and $600, AAA urges drivers to save at least $50 a month for unforeseen expenses, and identify a trusted repair facility before trouble strikes.

“The average cost of owning and operating a vehicle is more than $8,500 a year, and AAA has found that millions of Americans are failing to set aside a car care fund to pay for the upkeep of their cars,” said John Nielsen, AAA’s managing director of Automotive Engineering and Repair. “To avoid a surprise down the road, drivers should budget for monthly payments, insurance premiums, fuel costs and the inevitable expenses of routine maintenance and repair.”

Whether you have a gas-powered car, an electric or a hybrid car, your battery can suffer in cold winter weather. Lauren Fix, The Car Coach® provides tips on how to protect your car's battery and improve your fuel economy in the cold temperatures.

China is the largest automotive market in the world. Plug in hybrids are important for their culture, and also the environment. Plug in vehicles are not only popular in the United States, but also across the world. Learn more about going electric, autonomous vehicles and world wide car tech trends with The Car Coach®, Lauren Fix.

The national average price of gas continues to decline as U.S. oil production increases. Today’s average price of $2.31 per gallon represents a decrease of three cents per gallon on the week, four cents per gallon on the month, and prices have moved lower for 14 of the past 15 days. Despite this recent trend lower, retail averages are up by 46 cents per gallon as compared to one year ago.

Quick Stats
The nation’s top five least expensive markets are: South Carolina ($2.07), Tennessee ($2.11), Alabama ($2.11), Mississippi ($2.11) and Indiana ($2.12).

The states with the largest weekly decreases in gas prices include: Ohio (-13 cents), Michigan (-12 cents), Indiana (-8 cents), Illinois (-8 cents) and Kentucky (-6 cents).

New AAA survey reveals that 35 percent of Americans will travel as a family this year

ORLANDO, Fla. (February 7, 2017) – Now is the time when millions of families across the country are starting to plan getaways for spring break, summer vacation and long holiday weekends throughout the year. According to a recent AAA survey, more than one-third of Americans (35 percent) are planning to take a vacation of 50 miles or more away from home involving two or more immediate family members this year. The overall volume of travelers remains unchanged from last year, indicating that Americans continue to prioritize traveling as a family.

While most family travelers (70 percent) are planning to take one or two vacations, there is a significant increase this year in the number of Americans who say they are planning to take three or more vacations. The 28 percent of family travelers who will take three or more trips this year is 13 percentage points higher than in 2016.

WASHINGTON – U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx today announced that the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) has designated 10 proving ground pilot sites to encourage testing and information sharing around automated vehicle technologies. These proving ground designations will foster  innovations that can safely transform personal and commercial mobility, expand capacity, and open new doors to disadvantaged people and communities. These designations are a logical next step in the Department’s effort to advance the safe deployment of automated technology. 

“The designated proving grounds will collectively form a Community of Practice around safe testing and deployment,” said Secretary Foxx.  “This group will openly share best practices for the safe conduct of testing and operations as they are developed, enabling the participants and the general public to learn at a faster rate and accelerating the pace of safe deployment.” 

The proving grounds will also provide critical insights into optimal big data usage through automated vehicle testing and will serve as a foundation for building a community of practice around automated vehicle research.

Basic auto care goes a long way toward improving the safety and dependability of a vehicle. Whether you do it yourself or visit a trusted professional technician, the non-profit Car Care Council recommends 10 Fall

Car Care Month maintenance procedures to help make sure your car is operating at its best before winter arrives.

“Fall Car Care Month in October is the ideal time to give your car some extra attention before harsh winter weather sets in,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Taking a little time for auto care now can help you avoid the headaches of a costly emergency breakdown later.”

  • Check all fluids, including engine oil, power steering, brake and transmission as well as windshield washer solvent and antifreeze/coolant.
  • Check the hoses and belts to make sure they are not cracked, brittle, frayed, loose or showing signs of excessive wear.
  • Check the battery and replace if necessary. Make sure the connection is clean, tight and corrosion-free.
  • Check the brake system annually and have the brake linings, rotors and drums inspected at each oil change.
  • Inspect the exhaust system for leaks, damage and broken supports or hangers if there is an unusual noise. Exhaust leaks can be dangerous and must be corrected without delay.
  • Check the engine to make sure it is delivering the best balance of power and fuel economy and producing the lowest level of emissions.
  • Check the heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system as proper heating and cooling performance is critical for interior comfort and safety reasons, such as defrosting.
  • Inspect the steering and suspension system annually, including shock absorbers, struts and chassis parts such as ball joints, tie rod ends and other related components.
  • Check the tires, including tire pressure and tread. Uneven wear indicates a need for wheel alignment. Tires should also be checked for bulges and bald spots.
  • Check the wipers and lighting so that you can see and be seen. Check that all interior and exterior lighting is working properly and replace worn wiper blades so you can see clearly when driving during precipitation.

New partnership aims to end traffic fatalities within the next 30 years

WASHINGTON – U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Federal Highway Administration, and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration are joining forces with the National Safety Council (NSC) to launch the Road to Zero Coalition with the goal of ending fatalities on the nation's roads within the next 30 years. The Department of Transportation has committed $1 million a year for the next three years to provide grants to organizations working on lifesaving programs.

"Our vision is simple – zero fatalities on our roads," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. "We know that setting the bar for safety to the highest possible standard requires commitment from everyone to think differently about safety – from drivers to industry, safety organizations and government at all levels."

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