Latest News From Bumper to Bumper Radio

A video shows two cars crashing head-on at 35 miles per hour. (Don't worry, the drivers are crash test dummies.) One car is red, one is silver.

The red car crumples like an accordion. The dummy's face collides with the steering wheel as glass flies everywhere. Then the entire front of the cabin collapses in, pushing the dummy's knees up and crushing them against the dashboard.

The front of the silver car is also crushed. But the frame of the car is relatively intact This dummy flies forward in the seat belt, but front and side airbags soften the blow. The windshield cracks, but doesn't shatter. They're both Nissan cars. The red car is a 2015 Tsuru, manufactured for sale in Mexico. The silver one is a 2016 Versa, made for the U.S. market.
 
In a crash test, Mexico's lowest-priced Nissan (left) collided with America's least expensive Nissan. The dummy's face hit the steering wheel in the Mexican model. Airbags in the American model softened the blow.

That very unofficial nine mile-per-hour “tolerance cushion” on Arizona’s interstate highway system is going away by the end of the month on certain freeway segments.

Arizona Department of Transportation, Department of Public Safety and Governor’s Office of Highway Safety are designating 63 miles of Interstates 10 and 40, and U.S. 60 as safety corridors.

These zero-tolerance corridors will see heavy traffic enforcement efforts in an attempt to reduce the number of accidents, motorist injuries and excessive deaths.

The news from ADOT came Dec. 12, the day the first phase of enforcement went into effect for two segments on I-10.

Listen to Dave Riccio of Bumper to Bumper Radio & Tri-City Transmission along with a panel of BBB Ethics Award winners share winning strategies in the areas of marketing, technology, human resources, and finance.

BBB Torch Awards for Ethics winners also highlight how ethics impacts their bottom line and company culture.

 

Retail averages have increased 28 of the past 30 days and prices have moved higher by fractions of a penny since Friday. The national average for regular unleaded gasoline currently sits at $2.29 per gallon, which is five cents more than one week ago, 16 cents more than one month ago and 29 cents more year-over-year.

Heading into 2017, gasoline demand is expected to drop drastically during the month of January following the busy holiday travel season. Over the past five years, the average drop during that period has been 358,000 b/d or about 15-million gallons, according to OPIS. The oil information service estimates a larger dip this year.